Senator Tim Scott (R-SC) spoke with Fox News Radio's Guy Benson about Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi's 'Murder' smear against Republicans. Calling It "The most outrageous, sinful comment I've heard as a public official period." Senator Scott continued by saying,

"I thought to myself that how in the world does this woman sitting, standing in front of a twenty four thousand dollar refrigerator have the sense to jump into the bottomless pit of race politics? Why in the world would she want to do that? There's only one answer, by the way. One answer. It's because she's lived so long in a state of privilege that she has forgotten. That is the Republican Party that voted more for the civil rights era legislation than the Democrats. It's because she's forgotten that it was President Trump and the criminal justice reform done in 2018 that made it for the Democrats 1994 crime bill. She's forgotten. That is the school choice movement that frees more kids in poverty from the poor education system brought to us by the Democrats and the teachers unions than they've ever seen. She has forgotten so much about reality that she spends too much time in an alternate universe. But the facts are simple. Why in the world would she stoop so low? And is simply this they believe. I truly believe this. They believe that campaigning on police brutality is more important than solving police reform."

Scott also alleged that there has been a "strategy" by Democrats to "erase" him from the conversation.

"I want to be clear and not hyperbolic. There has been a clear, consistent strategy to erase me from the conversation, because my experience as an African-American driving while black, my experience as an African-American growing up in poverty and facing discrimination."

Listen To The Full Interview Below:

Full Transcript: Guy Benson: I'm Guy Benson. Thanks for listening. Joining me now is U.S. Senator Tim Scott, Republican of South Carolina, primary author of the Justice Act. He also has written a book. Opportunity Knocks How Hard Work, Community and Business Can Improve Lives and Poverty. Senator, great to have you back.

Sen. Scott: Well, thank you, guy. I'm always excited to be on the show with you. A little intimidated because you're so smart, though.

Guy Benson: Oh, stop it. I have to say, let me return the compliment and pay it back to you. I was so impressed with your speech on the Senate floor on Wednesday. We've played part of it here. We've talked about it quite a lot. And I have so many questions I want to get to here in the next nine minutes that we have together. Let me start here. Speaker of the House waded into the controversy over your bill that you would offer. That, of course, was blocked and filibustered by the Democrats. They didn't want to talk about it. Debated, amended. She said that you and your Republican colleagues supporting the Justice Act were basically complicit in the murder of George Floyds, saying that you were trying to get away with his murder. As someone who's worked very hard on this issue as a black man. What was your reaction when you heard that from Speaker Pelosi?

Sen. Scott: It was the most outrageous, sinful comment I've heard as a public official period. I thought to myself that how in the world does this woman sitting, standing in front of a twenty four thousand dollar refrigerator have the sense to jump into the bottomless pit of race politics? Why in the world would she want to do that? There's only one answer, by the way. One answer. It's because she's lived so long in a state of privilege that she has forgotten. That is the Republican Party that voted more for the civil rights era legislation than the Democrats. It's because she's forgotten that it was President Trump and the criminal justice reform done in 2018 that made it for the Democrats 1994 crime bill. She's forgotten. That is the school choice movement that frees more kids in poverty from the poor education system brought to us by the Democrats and the teachers unions than they've ever seen. She has forgotten so much about reality that she spends too much time in an alternate universe. But the facts are simple. Why in the world would she stoop so low? And is simply this they believe. I truly believe this. They believe that campaigning on police brutality is more important than solving police reform.

Guy Benson: I fear that you are right and I don't like to be that cynical and I don't like to impute bad motives, but I think with her she's earned it, especially on this issue. And I'm just I'm sort of recovering from that fire emoji response that you just gave me to Speaker Pelosi. And I want to follow up with this, because we also played at some length yesterday on the program, part of the speech from your colleague, the Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, yesterday on the floor. We actually have Senator McConnell coming up in the next hour on the show today. He in his speech, his opening remarks on the floor yesterday pointed out that Chuck Schumer, the Democratic leader in the Senate, in his diatribe against your bill, did not even acknowledge your role or even your existence in this process. I noticed Speaker Pelosi was asked about you the other day and she immediately shut that down and said, I want to talk about Mitch McConnell. McConnell was suggesting, I think pretty clearly that the Democratic leaders, both of whom, of course, are white, do not want you to be part of this conversation because you are an African-American. And it complicates the narrative and the politics that they're trying to play. So they're kind of airbrushing you or racing you out of this. That was the contention from McConnell. Do you agree? Is that what your feeling?

Sen. Scott: Guy, I want to be clear and not hyperbolic. There has been a clear, consistent strategy to erase me from the conversation, because my experience as an African-American driving while black, my experience as an African-American growing up in poverty and facing discrimination. My experience as an African-American, as having struggled in school. That narrative is supposed to be on the Democrat side. But the truth is, is one of the reasons why I said it in my speech on the floor. It was so important for me to suggest that as a young man, I never even considered the Republican Party because we were supposed to be Democrats. It's that notion that somehow, some way, because of the color of my skin, I'm supposed to be some place breaking out of that mold and thinking about what best suits me. That's what's called strength in your skin when you're strong in your skin. You you can reject stereotypes. And I learned how to do that. And with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer are saying is if we can erase Tim Scott from this conversation, what we can do is continue the narrative that Republicans are somehow weak on issues of race, somehow racists by default. It raises and eliminates the actual conversation from Abraham Lincoln, frankly, to Donald Trump and measuring progress by policies that have reinforce that America wants to be more fair and in a fair America. Everybody gets to compete. The Democrats want to control who is able to compete. That's one of the reasons why they decided not to allow Republicans to amend their bill. And one of the reasons why they rejected the opportunity to amend my bill. Right. As long as they can keep that face on the public forum, the faith of Republicans are bad. Democrats are good. Democrats are black. Republicans are white, as long as they can have that polarizing picture. And CNN and MSNBC will never play it differently. What you have is you're reinforcing this false narrative that you have no options, that the monopoly is permitted.

Guy Benson: And I noticed I noticed, Senator, that you have Pelosi and Schumer draping themselves and can't take loss and kneeling for the cameras and saying we must listen to black voices, but not your black voice. Apparently that one day you're sort of an exception there. In your speech on Wednesday, you also noted that everything that you just said is true about what the Democrats did procedurally. And you said part of the issue is many people will never hear about it. They'll never know because the media won't cover it. Sure enough. I don't know if you know this that evening after you gave that speech, after they filibustered your bill, before they even getting onto the bill to debate it all three broadcast networks, NBC, ABC and CBS and their evening newscast, not one of them had one second of coverage of what happened on Capitol Hill that day. So you were correct about that, Senator. So I want to ask you this, then. Where do we go from here? I mean, it sounded like you were very much open to a lot of amendments to ideas like, hey, mate, let's bring in let's bring in Senator Braun and Senator Markey. They're working together on reform when it comes to qualified immunity. Let's have an up or down vote on that, for example. You were saying let's discuss this. You don't think it goes far enough. You want stronger provisions here. Let's discuss it and have votes on amendments. They said no. Have they presented any argument that is remotely compelling for why they won't even talk?

Sen. Scott: Not a single one here. Here's what they said. They said, please get a reform bill on the floor by July 4th. We've brought the reform bill that they did not think we would bring. And we made it as much as possible encouraging and embracing Democrat philosophies that were just good in the in the House bill. I took two thirds of what I thought was a good start. I don't think we need all the data collection that the Democrats wanted. I think we needed serious bodily injury and death.

Guy Benson: Just to jump in because we only have about 30 seconds left. But I really tried to create a baseline to build off of. They refuse to even have that conversation in 50 or twenty seconds. Senator. Is there anything optimistic happening behind the scenes where there's maybe discussions happening in progress on the Senate side?

Sen. Scott: I've told the Democrats I am willing to meet with anyone, anywhere, anytime to move this legislation forward. What I will not do is demonize police officers and stereotype them in the same way that I felt stereotyped as a young African-American. I can't do that to someone else if I don't want it done to me.

Guy Benson: Senator Tim Scott, Republican of South Carolina, on The Guy Benson Show. Senator, thank you. Have a good weekend and we'll talk soon. We'll be right back. Guy.