Radio Buzz: Fired for Facebook Status; The “Spongebob Effect”

The Radio Buzz. The top talk radio stories of the day.

Audio clip:

Five workers fired -- for complaining about their jobs on Facebook will head back to work after the National Labor Relations Board ruled in their favor.

"This particular one is getting a lot of attention - because a group of employees acted together in what's called a concerted activity - that's a legal term. And because they acted together they fell under these national labor law protections."

So if I'm acting with other people - I have protection. But if it's me individually - am I NOT protected?

"That is the way the law appears to work - currently - but we'll see how that evolves down the road."

That was HR Consultant Paul Bazell speaking with Charly Butcher at WOWO in Fort Wayne, IN.

But he makes a good point...

"Even if a current employer is not allowed to take action against an employee for what they're saying negatively about them in their social media - there's a possibility that a future employer who you want to go to work for - is going to be scanning what you've put out there in the public domain - and if it's less than complimentary or wonderful - all of a sudden someone might see a job opportunity evaporate."

His message is simple -- be mindful of the content you put on social networking sites...

Buzzing right along...

Spongebob... he and his square pants are certainly entertaining -- but is it good for our kids health???

"I don't think it is Spongebob in general - I think it is specific - I think it's any of these shows that are cut that quickly so that the kids attention has to constantly be moving like that to keep up - and then when the show turns off they kind of expect that kind of rapid stimulation when it's turned off, and that doesn't happen in the real world."

That was American Family Therapist Melody Brooke speaking with Forrest Goodman at WERC in Birmingham, AL.

What effects do we see in children that watch these sorts of shows?

"It causes them to be anxious - it causes them to have less attention and it causes them to be more agitated in general."

That is a problem.

"Watching too much television does have the impact on our kids and their ability to stay focused - and of course they're going to be anxious because they're not spending enough quality time with their parents..."

Most of that "quality time" Melody refers too - is spent sitting in front of the television.

The answer - according to Brookes - is to educate parents on the effects these sorts of shows have on our children...

I'm Jessica Curtis - and that's your Talk Radio Buzz, from Fox News Radio.