Radio Buzz: 9/11 Coloring Book Controversy; Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights?

The Radio Buzz.  The top talk radio stories of the day.

Audio clip:

 

A 9/11 coloring book for kids is causing a controversy.

It's called - "We shall never forget 9/11 -- the kids book of freedom", and starts with Bin Laden plotting the attack on the U.S. - and ends with the raid on his compound.

Is it appropriate?

"I think it's more of a coloring book that is teaching hate - about - you know an event that based upon this coloring book is one sided. I think it's horrible that someone would come up with a gimmick like this to make money - and damage the minds of children."

President of the nonprofit group "Muslims Educating Americans" Thomas Muhammad speaking with Jamie Allman at KFTK in St. Louis, MO.

 

"I'm just saying that - you know - this is a one sided piece. There were close to 62 Muslims who died in those towers. There was a mosque in those towers. And so the people who attacked the towers didn't care about anyone's religion - it was more about politics. And so the issue is is that at some point in time we have to say enough is enough and we need to stop this sit down and find ways we can work together as people in this country."

The coloring book has a PG rating and is currently only available online.

 Buzzing right along...

The anti-bullying bill of rights.

That's right.

The state of New Jersey - taking the lead - creating it and now is attempting to enforce it.

Can it actually be enforced?

"For one: teachers are designed to teach.  They have enough to do. Isn't that what we want to do with our teachers is have them teach reading and writing and math and stuff like that?"

"Yeah - but it seems like they're not even teaching much anymore - they're either teaching to a test or they're having to do paper work or they're having to be you know - classroom monitor and baby-sitter.

"That's a whole new conversation."

That was Former Teacher, Educational Expert and Author Dan McLaughlin speaking with Louis at WPLZ in Chattanooga.

 And, that's not McLaughlin's only issue with the law:

"Secondly - how are they going to interpret bullying? It's a totally subjective definition of bullying."

What else, Dan?

"And the third thing is - and you've touched on this - was what about the internet - what about Facebook - what about texting?  When the vast majority of this is done at home.  So my biggest fear is that they're going to go into the home - much like the patriot act which monitors all threats - you know - is every student a threat because they have to be monitored? I don't know how they're going to do this."

Sounds like it could be an infringement on personal privacy rights.

...makes me wonder how long the anti-bullying bill of rights will be around.

I'm Jessica Curtis - and that's your Talk Radio Buzz, from Fox News Radio.