The Radio Buzz.... the top talk radio stories of the day.

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A guy in jail in Tacoma, WA -- accused of some pretty serious sex crimes -- get this one -- is permitted to watch kiddie porn - in jail?

How does that one work? That question asked by Rob Johnson at WGST in Atlanta of Former Sex Crimes Prosecutor Dan Conaway...

Conaway's answer?

"Well - he has a right to represent himself. And as such - he has a right to review the evidence in his case because he's acting as his own council."

I'm sorry, but this story is just weird...or at least, that's what Chip Franklin from KOGO in San Diego thinks...

"Anita - have you ever heard of a weirder story than this?"

"It's very weird - but it's actually not as uncommon as you would think."

"Wow."

That was Chip - speaking with Former Sex Crimes Prosecutor Anita Kay.

We're talking 100 videos and photographs - that were seized from his home when he was arrested 3 years ago. Police saying most of that was stuff that he -- Weldon Marc Gilbert -- actually shot himself...

"As far as Washington state goes - I gotta imagine that the Pierce County Sherriff isn't the only one with this kind of reaction. What is the legal reaction there?"

"Well - you know - it may be frustrating - but it's absolutely necessary. The last thing that these people want is to go thru the expense of a trial and have to redo it because the evidence that was going to be used in trial was never made accessible to the Defense. And that's exactly what could happen if they don't make this evidence available to him."

So there's no way out of this?

"Well - maybe there is a way out of it - that the Sherriff's department can monitor him while he's looking at it - to the point where they can control his conduct. What they can't do is watch what he's watching such that they're interfering with his preparation. "

Former Sex Crimes Prosecutor Nicole Deborde speaking with Michaiana's Morning News in at 95.3 MNC.

Buzzing right along...

American's face bullying... not just on the playground... but also in the office... that - according to the Workplace Bullying Institute.

"I'm looking at some statistics here... it says that 35% of the US workforce - that's about 53 million Americans - report being bullied at work. 62% of bullies are men, 58% of targets are women. Is this an epidemic problem?"

"It is a problem. You know - I get phone calls at least once a week about this - and generally speaking it's not actionable."

Denton Randall at WHAS in Louisville... speaking with Employment Attorney Kelly Saindon...

The WBI defines workplace bullying as: "repeated, health-harming mistreatment of one of more persons by one or more perpetrators"...

These actions - according to the WBI - have serious long lasting side effects for victims...

Kelly - why the increased push by lobbyists to have state law makers pass anti bullying in the workplace legislation?

"Unless they're a protected class - and the bullying relates to something else - there's nothing they can do - they can complain about it - but it isn't actionable."

What would make it actionable, then?

"The Courts usually say - a certain level of this - putting somebody down - or harassing them (and they use that term loosely) is ok - it's only to the point of where its incessant, repeated, or such that they can't adequately do their job - because they're constantly being teased that makes it actionable. Because it's a pretty high standard."

I'm Jessica Curtis - and that's your Talk Radio Buzz, from Fox News Radio.