The radio buzz.... the top talk radio stories of the day.

 

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The Supreme Court - throwing out a huge sexual discriminations lawsuit brought against retail giant - Wal-Mart. The suit included EVERY woman who had worked for Wal-Mart since December of 1998...

That's more than 1.5 million women in all!

 

"And it was just unwieldy, isn't that the reason they threw it out?"

That was John Howell from WIND in Chicago - speaking this morning with Walter Olson - who is a Senior Fellow at the CATO Institute's Center for Constitutional Studies.

Olson's answer?

 

"Not just that it was big and unwieldy - but that there was no way that all of those women's had the same grievance and same legal claim."

Trying to lump together many different complaints into one suit...

"They just said - you can sue - sometimes you can sue as a class action - but they've all got to have the same grievance but that clearly is not the case here."

The handful of women who brought the case may pursue their claims on their own, with much less money at stake and less pressure on Wal-Mart to settle.

Buzzing right along...

...ninety days and counting - since the US got involved in the Libyan civil war...

...all the while - a growing coalition of Congressional Republicans and Democrats - who say that the Obama Administration is in violation of the law...

Why?

"The President needs to come to them and request their authorization - for the war in Libya. Or what they're calling a conflict in Libya. There's a little bit of debate about how this is even defined because the President is trying to say that we're not engaged in hostilities there - and therefore he doesn't need Congressional authorization."

That was Emily Cadei - a Foreign Policy Reporter for CQ Roll Call speaking with Trey at 92.5 FOX News.

...Congressional authorization - part of a law that has governed U.S. military deployments for the past 38 years.

"It's a long time debate between the two branches of Government about who can control the power to go to war."

"The President needs to come to them and request their authorization - for the war in Libya. Or what they're calling a conflict in Libya. There's a little bit of debate about how this is even defined because the President is trying to say that we're not engaged in hostilities there - and therefore he doesn't need Congressional authorization."

That was Emily Cadei - a Foreign Policy Reporter for CQ Roll Call speaking with Trey at 92.5 FOX News.

...Congressional authorization - part of a law that has governed U.S. military deployments for the past 38 years.

"It's a long time debate between the two branches of Government about who can control the power to go to war."

I'm Jessica Curtis - and that's your Talk Radio Buzz, from Fox News Radio.