How The Health Care Overhaul Affects You

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The New York Times highlights how we’re impacted by the new legislation.

  • If you are insured and pay on your own: You can keep your current plan— or —you can buy coverage through new state-run insurance marketplaces, called “exchanges,” starting in 2014
  • If you are insured through your employer: You can keep your current plan — or — you can buy coverage through new state-run insurance marketplaces, called “exchanges,” starting in 2014.
  • If you are insured and receive coverage from Medicare: You will pay less for preventive care and prescription drugs. Your benefits might change if you are insured through a private Medicare Advantage plan.
  • If you are insured and receive coverage from Medicaid:You and your children can maintain eligibility and receive free preventive services.
  • If you are uninsured, you can get coverage from a high-risk pool: If you are refused coverage because of your health, you can get insurance from a new high-risk pool.
  • If you are uninsured, you can get coverage through Medicaid: You can obtain coverage through Medicaid.
  • If you are uninsured, you can get coverage from exchanges: If your employer does not cover you, and you make too much to qualify for Medicaid, you can buy from private insurers through exchanges starting in 2014.
  • If you do not buy insurance:

Starting in 2014, most Americans will be required to buy health insurance or pay a penalty.

The penalty will be phased in, starting at $95 or 1 percent of income in 2014, whichever is higher, and rising to $695 or 2.5 percent of income in 2016. But families would not pay more than $2,085.

American Indians don’t have to buy insurance. Those with religious objections or a financial hardship can also avoid the requirement. And if you would pay more than 8 percent of your income for the cheapest available plan, you will not be penalized for failing to buy coverage.

Those who are exempt, or under 30, can buy a policy that only pays for catastrophic medical costs. It must allow for three primary care visits a year as well.

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